Images by Skye Yonamine

1. Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann

Recommended by Timothy A. Schuler

“Tells the story of the Osage tribe in the 1920s, shortly after oil is discovered under land deeded to them by the U.S. government. When tribe members begin dying off in increasingly suspicious manner, the then nascent FBI sends agents to investigate. It’s a remarkable work of reportage, and Grann, as methodical as a coroner, pieces together new evidence to implicate everyone from local physicians to policy makers in Washington, DC.”

2. Miss Ulysses from Puka-puka by Florence (Johnny) Frisbie

Recommended by Elyse Butler

“Amazing memoir from the eyes of a young girl growing up on a remote atoll in the South Seas in the 1940’s.”

3. The Autobiography of Malcolm X: As Told to Alex Haley by Malcolm X and Alex Haley

Recommended by Kylie Yamauchi

“What I find most powerful about this text is Malcolm X’s refiguring of black masculinity, from his days as a hustler up until his death as a civil rights leader. His ability to use his own gender expression to create a new politics for the black community is a power not many people can yield.”

4. The Wayfinders by Wade Davis

Recommended by Bailey Rebecca Roberts

“It discusses hierarchy of knowledge and dissects the problematic structure of power in modernity in regard to cultural homogeny.”

5. The First and Last Freedom by J. Krishnamurti

Recommended by Christian R. Cook

“A book I’ve read through slowly, digesting its powerful message of transformation of self and the individual. Our country and world are becoming more divided, and the powers that be have no desire to seek unification of our people. Krishnamurti’s book is about the power of thought and perspective, and their ability to change us and the world around us, to engender an inner transmutation through a shift in point of view.”

Visit Da Shop: Books & Curiosities in Kaimukī to pick up a copy of the titles and the FLUX Power issue.