Issue 2: Water

FLUX Cover of Issue 2: Water
Cover image by Jim Russi.

When we are surrounded by water on every side, it becomes easy to forget this natural resource is precious. This issue documents watery issues prevalent not just in our city, but as experienced by surrounding cultures as well.

Editor’s Letter: Driving down Ala Moana Boulevard, it can be easy to get blinded by the sea of red brake lights flashing in front of you. It’s easy to get caught up in what’s happening in front of us – the bastard who just cut you off, the never-ending road work to fill in potholes, rubber-necking at the idiot pulled over by police (Ha! Sucker.) – and forget that which is all around us. That between the trees at Ala Moana Beach Park, behind the homeless shopping carts and tents, is a body of water that stretches as far as the eye can see. Sometimes you’ll see white peaks firing at Big Rights. In the winter, or on weekends, the drive up Kamehameha Highway up to the North Shore is just as frustrating.

When inherent beauty is a part of our everyday lives, it becomes just that, everyday and mundane. When we are surrounded by water on every side, it becomes easy to forget that this natural resource is precious, something not to be used and abused. With the theme of “Water,” our goal was to put water under a microscope, to document issues prevalent not just in our city, but as experienced by surrounding cultures as well. To help us remember that water and beaches are not to be taken for granted and that our inputs have a direct effect on the quality of the water that we drink and play in.

So with that we very proudly bring you our second issue. After having a year to produce our first, these past three months have whizzed by. But phew! We made it. Especially with the closing down of publications and the consolidation of local media, we do hope to cultivate discussion and create an environment that fosters creativity and collaboration among all mediums.

Enjoy,
Lisa Yamada
Publisher/Editor

Click here to purchase past issues of Flux.

Featured Stories:

Save our Surf
Image by John Kelly

Save Our Surf
A legacy of waves, friends, and resistance in the Aloha State.

FLUX Guide to Water Conservation
Illustration by Jennifer Yoko Thorbjornsen

FLUX Guide to Water Conservation
If we all agree that water is a precious resource essential for life, then why are we abusing the way we use it?

Image courtesy of Save Our Surf

Notes From Ed Greevy
Throughout the latter half of the 20th century, Save Our Surf and its primary organizer, John M. Kelly Jr., organized against the overdevelopment of Hawaii’s shorelines. Photographer Ed Greevy talks about the movement with FLUX.

Easy Rider Redux
Image by Jim Russi

Easy Rider Redux
For the past 30 years, Jim Russi has been capturing a snapshot into the spirit of what happens when mortals and mother nature collide.