Image of ‘Ike courtesy of HIFF

There is something empowering and enchanting about seeing yourself–your culture, where you’re from–on film. With HIFF, now is the chance to experience this sensation through films that do justice to our stories, bring magic into our lives. The Hawai‘i International Film Festival is featuring many films for the first time on the islands’ big screen from all over the world, but what are equally exciting are the local achievements in HIFF’s Made in Hawai‘i section—self-explanatorily, films made in Hawai‘i by our best and brightest.

“The Made in Hawai‘i section showcases the very best in Hawai‘i-made films. It’s that simple,” says Anderson Le, HIFF Program Director. “It also represents the diverse perspectives that make up the multi-cultural spectrum of Hawai‘i … Made in Hawai‘i presents the vanguard of locally based filmmakers that are shaping the future of filmmaking here.” Below are the three feature films made in Hawai’i that are showing at the ongoing festival:

‘Ike: Knowledge is Everywhere

Sequel to Ola – Health is Everything, ‘Ike Knowledge is Everywhere focuses on the importance of developing a quality education, with a variety of stories from students, teachers, and advocates. Directed by Matthew Nagato.

‘Ike: Knowledge is Everywhere is showing on Thursday, November 6 at 6:30 p.m. at Dole Cannery G, Sunday, November 9 at 11 a.m. at Koko Marina B, and Saturday, November 15 at 2:30 p.m. at Hilo Palace Theater.

 

Screenshot of a film recording preserved by ‘Ulu’ulu of Iolani Palace during restoration.

Iolani Palace: Restoration & Hawaii’s Past Today

For the first time in over 30 years, 49 motion picture film reels from the Friends of ‘Iolani Palace collection will be shown, presenting the restoration of ‘Iolani Palace from 1969 to 1979. Directed by The Friends of ‘Iolani Palace and George Tahara.

Iolani Palace: Restoration & Hawaii’s Past Today is showing on November 8 at 4 p.m. at Dole Cannery D.

 

Rise of the Wahine

This story about the volleyball team of the University of Hawai‘i and their desire for gender equality in education, sports, and employment would become the stepping stone and spark for what would become Title IX, a piece of U.S. legislation that declared gender equity in education and funding, including athletics programs, championed by such changemakers as U.S. congresswoman Patsy Mink and Dr. Donnis Thompson, who helped start UH’s women’s athletics program and was one of the nation’s first female collegiate coaches in the nation. Directed by Dean Kaneshiro.

Rise of the Wahine is showing on Sunday, November 9 at 2:30 p.m. at Dole Cannery F, Friday, November 14 at 5 p.m. at Waimea Theater Kauai, and Sunday, November 16 at 4:45 p.m. at Hilo Palace Theater.

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Made in Hawai’i Shorts

While the showtime has already passed on O ‘ahu, Big Island attendees still have a chance to watch this collection of short films, touching films with stories that range from an entertaining duel between lei makers at Honolulu International Airport stands, to the incorporation of the Hawaiian concept of Lahaina noon into a dramatic contemporary tale.

Made in Hawai’i Shorts are showing on Friday, November 7 at 8 p.m. at Koko Marina A.

 For more information, visit hiff.org.